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“O my Lord, the stars glitter
and the eyes of men are closed.
Kings have locked their doors
and each lover is alone with his beloved.
Here, I am alone with You.”
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“Beware of confining yourself to a particular conception and denying all else for much good would elude you. Indeed the knowledge of reality would elude you. Be in yourself a substance for all forms, for God is too vast and tremendous to be restricted to one form of belief rather than another.”

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(as quoted by Pir Zia Inayat Khan Sufi Conference 2005

via https://goldensufi.org/audioarchives.html#sc )

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Water
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I was born in a drouth year. That summer

my mother waited in the house, enclosed

in the sun and the dry ceaseless wind,

for the men to come back in the evenings,

bringing water from a distant spring.

Veins of leaves ran dry, roots shrank.

And all my life I have dreaded the return

of that year, sure that it still is

somewhere, like a dead enemy’s soul.

Fear of dust in my mouth is always with me,

and I am the faithful husband of the rain,

I love the water of wells and springs

and the taste of roofs in the water of cisterns.

I am a dry man whose thirst is praise

of clouds, and whose mind is something of a cup.

My sweetness is to wake in the night

after days of dry heat, hearing the rain.
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(from “Farming: A Handbook” by Wendell Berry)
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Chapter Forty-seven

Without going outside, you may know the whole world.

Without looking through the window, you may see the ways of heaven.

The farther you go, the less you know.

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Thus the sage knows without traveling;

He sees without looking;

He works without doing.

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(from Lao Tsu’s – “Tao Te Ching”, translated by Gia-Fu Feng and Jane English)

Chapter Fifteen
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The ancient masters were subtle, mysterious, profound, responsive.

The depth of their knowledge is unfathomable.

Because it is unfathomable,

All we can do is describe their appearance.

Watchful, like men crossing a winter stream.

Alert, like men aware of danger.

Courteous, like visiting guests.

Yielding, like ice about to melt.

Simple, like uncarved blocks of wood.

Hollow, like caves.

Opaque, like muddy pools.

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Who can wait quietly while the mud settles?

Who can remain still until the moment of action?

Observers of the Tao do not seek fulfillment.

Not seeking fulfillment, they are not swayed by desire for change.

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(Lao Tsu – Tao Te Ching – Translated by Gia-Fu Feng and Jane English)
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In the beginning I was mistaken in four respects.
I concerned myself to remember God, to know Him,
to love Him, and to seek Him.
When I had come to the end I saw that He had remembered me
before I remembered Him.
That His knowledge of me, had preceded my knowledge of Him.
That His love towards me had existed before my love to Him,
and He had sought me before I sought Him
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(as quoted by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, 2006 Sufi Conference, Opening Talk Part A
https://goldensufi.org/audioarchives.html#sc
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It is very necessary to build into one’s routine times for prayer, contemplation and meditation. Each time you go back to that same place to perform your prayer, your prayer is deeper. You are building up a magnetism every time you perform that prayer in the same place, at the same time. The Sufis explain this by saying that when a person is praying while an angel is passing by, flying overhead and they notice a person in an act of prayer, they take note of it and will come back the next day, at the same time. And if you are there they’ll take a note of that and be sure to come back each day, at that time. Of course if you’re not there at that time they’ll lose interest. In this way one after another, unseen beings become attracted and soon you find yourself praying, not alone, but in the company of beings of light. What seemed at first an isolated, private prayer has become a congregational prayer.
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Sufi Conference 2005, Pir Zia Inayat Khan: The Inner Dimensions of Prayer, Part A
https://goldensufi.org/audioarchives.html#sc
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